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Watercolor painting without Frustration.

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Flat Wash in Watercolor

 

Paint a rectangle for a Flat Wash in Watercolor.

Choose a flat or round brush.

Tilt board and paper towards you about 2".

Right hand painters will go from left to right with paint strokes.

Charge brush with paint and starting in upper left corner touch brush to paper and gently pull a straight line of paint to the upper right corner.  Refill brush.  Make second stroke quickly don't let first stroke dry.  Start second stroke at the bottom of the first stroke, being sure just to overlap the bead of paint now formed at the bottom of the first stroke.  Refill brush after each complete stroke.

Continue overlapping strokes, riding and pulling the beads all the way to the bottom.

Rinse brush, squeeze out water and run the damp brush along the last formed bead at bottom of the exercise.  You should end up with an even toned rectangle of color.

Remember good quality paint and paper will make your work easier by offering consistent high quality.

 

TESTIMONIALS

 

"I can't thank you enough for this generous offer of yours to send these free advice, tips, instructions and insights into problems and solutions.
I am a beginner at watercolour even though I am not so young. I am presently taking a course which I enjoy tremendously.
Your e-mails confirm and add to the information I am receiving from my teacher and serves also as a reminder. I have also visited the back issues (I am not finished yet with the reading) which I find very useful.
This is the first time I am receiving your e-mail and I am looking forward to the others with impatience. Once again, thank you, Mariette"


 

"I just want you to know that I think this is the most wonderful website for Watercolor Painting.
As a new student to the medium, I have learned so very much from your weekly instructions. As a matter of fact, I have saved them all.
Keep up the wonderful instructions as it is well appreciated.
Thank you - Carol - Florida"



"I enjoy reading your newsletters and I really look forward to them.
You have the knack of knowing intermately what difficulties that I have. What uncertain thoughts I have thought and what disappointed feelings I have had.
I do try to take yoursuggestions to heart as well.
Thanks for talking in such easy to understand words. Jane"



"Thank you very much forthe weekly report. It's hard to tell how much I appreciate your great helpfor a beginner like me.
As you can see here, every Tuesday I check my e-mail often and just can't wait to get the report. I like the way you put it simple and clear, especially with demos. I understand they are years of experience.
Also, you are so kind to provide a chance to show our own work on your website, it is so exciting to see it on the web and even moreto read comments from viewers. I got a bit addicted to it.
All these have been very supportive for me to continue the passion on top of my hectic daily life I'm learning, improving, and happily dreaming to be an artist some day.
Thanks again and all the best - Helen- Toronto"


"As an instructional designer, I am very impressed by the design of your site. The step-by-step demonstrations are explicit and easy to follow. The text part is kept to a minimum without sacrificing the essential instructions.
Moreover, your way of writing makes the site "real". I almost could feel as if you were explaining the art of the art right in front of me. What I like the most is the mini-demonstrations. The way you do it takes away the fear from beginners.
The lesson about the green pepper allows beginners to start painting "for display". They can paint the pepper, frame it, and display it in the kitchen, or they can make a card out of it and mail it to their friends.
Thank you so much for the well-put effort and your generousity. I really enjoy your online studio. It is well designed, and personable.--- zalea."


Go to Graded Wash in Watercolor

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Watercolor Basics

One of the biggest reasons that students fail in painting Watercolor is................. JUDGING YOUR EARLY ARTISTIC EFFORTS.

YOU DON'T NEED TO FAIL IN WATERCOLORS!

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Watercolor for Beginners

Learn the basics of watercolor painting... from choosing the right paper and brushes to learning basic techniques of glazing and how to frame your work.

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Watercolor Techniques

Learn just a few of the various techniques used most often by professional watercolorists to bring interest, texture and "life" to their watercolor paintings.

Each technique is fully demonstrated.

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Painting Trees

Although trees are made up of many parts and endless textures don't let them become overwhelming, you cannot fall out of these painted trees. I know you can paint good looking trees with a little help. So lets see how you are going to do this without getting bent out of shape, irritated or what-ever you do when those Green Balls on sticks appear.......been there...done that.

Painting Landscapes

I am going to present to you a "non encyclopedia" approach and give you a no fuss, logical way to paint a watercolor landscape and have fun doing it. Before we start, get comfortable maybe a favorite beverage would be in order.Make your mistakes, goofs and failures work to help you in painting a watercolor landscape.

  • Four Seasons
  • Working With Fresh Transparent Glazes
  • Watercolor Painting in the Great Outdoors
  • Painting Clouds in Watercolor
  • Step by step Demonstration on Watercolor Winter Scenes
  • Demonstration of Painting Trees Trunks
  • Demonstration of Rocks and Sea
  • Demonstration of Watercolor Skies
  • Watercolor Landscape Painting Tips

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