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Watercolor-Just-Got-Easier
September 02, 2008
Hi

WATERCOLOR PAINTING JUST GOT EASIER FOR YOU

NO MORE TIME WASTING WITH TRIAL AND ERROR

SUPRISE YOUR CLOSE ONE'S WHEN THEY SEE YOUR PAINTINGS

IF YOU THINK YOU CAN PAINT OR IF YOU THINK YOU CANNOT PAINT YOU ARE RIGHT.

YOU CAN LEARN TO PAINT BEAUTIFUL WATERCOLORS.

MINI COURSE 4

SPECIAL EFFECTS

MIST, FOG, HAZE AND RAIN.

 

These are all going to be controlled by the lighting and atmospheric conditions.  Bright sun, overcast day, etc.

Knowing how to make the most of the various lighting situations will mean better paintings for you.

Get some visual drama into your work.  Watch what everybody else is painting, example green field, blue sky, red barn and DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT.

TIME OF DAY.

 

The best light to paint or photograph is most often when the sun is low.  When it's coming or going.

Light is richer as it passes through more atmosphere.

First light of day, before the sun peeks over the horizon, is interesting and atmospheric.

Great time for city dwellers, the towering buildings appear as dark silhouettes against the ever changing sky.

Morning light, as sun climbs high into the sky.  The warm colors give way to the shades of blue.

Haze will begin to disappear and shadows become shorter.

  

Light at sunset, has rich dramatic color

Foregound objects become silhouettes with the sunset in the background.

Cloud cover best sunsets.

Recently sitting my deck, a hugh black ugly cloud came over the tree tops, "thought here is some rain".  Suddenly the sun that was saying goodnight, shone on it and in a flash from black to this.

 

Light at Night.

Great for city folks, can have some interesting natural light from the moon or help from artificial light.

Glowing points of light in the darkness of night generate a mood of quiet and loneliness.

FOG

Objects dissolve in the luminous light (haze).  It creates an eerie feeling.

 

The edges of objects close to the viewer will glow and become hazy.  Depth of vision is limited due to the thick atmosphere.

In fog and mist, marks and shapes can be created by irregular drying of the washes.  Exercise control when necessary, but let go every now and then and let paint and water do their thing.

Some of the nicest effects are the unplanned unpredictable ones.

In painting fog you will note that objects very near you - because of the softness of fog and mist, have a tendency to appear quite sharp.

To paint fuzzy backgrounds keep the paper wet.  Keep working down, leaving unpainted only the white area such as boy's trunks, top of boat.

 

The reflections of boat and boys should be added only when paper is ALMOST dry.  Remember fog will lean towards the cool side.

THICK OR DENSE WOOD.

This is a step-by-step demonstration of how to paint thickly wooded areas.  After the pencil drawing is completed, paint in the light general tone of the entire area facing you (in this case it happens to be dense areas of browns) before attempting any of the trunks or structures.  The white birch in the foreground will have Maskoid over it to protect the whites while other color washes are being applied.

 

 

The next step is to indicate shadows from the trees with blues and Indian red blended together, sometimes accentuating the blue, sometimes the red, but never making it obvious.

 

The tree itself starting from the base of the shadow in the snow, is done with any dark earth color.  Next the general tone of the river could be done with greens, umbers and blues.

In the final picture, note that the birch is the last thing to be painted.  Remove the Maskoid before painting.  Now fill in the background - the limbs, twigs,and dead leaves, and other details which, of necessity, have to be held until the last. This also includes the reflections on the water

THE  EFFECT OF LIGHT ON FORM

Just as there is no color without light, so there is no form.  No surface vegetation grows without light, and the direction of light determines the direction in which vegetation will grow.

 

I have diagrammed the sun's journey from east to west, for sunrise to sunset.  As the sun casts its changing rays on the little acorn through the years, it gradually grows into majestic oaks, perfectly proportioned and in full bloom.

 

However, if the sun were to remain stationary, branches and foliage would grow only on that side of the tree exposed to the sun's rays.  To make the tree appear natural, draw it with shaggy lines, as few trees grow with absolutely smooth edges.  Start drawing from the ground up, as the tree grows, and twist pencil from side to side as you draw the line.  To give the trunk and branches roundness, keep edges soft.

Another phenomenon of the tree growth not generally known is indicated by the dotted line in the illustration; that is, the roots will grow to the same width as the width of the widest spreading branches.

 

In the illustration, one tree limb is shown with foliage on the top and none on the bottom, which is further evidence of the effect of the light's direction on growth.  In the another illustration, part  of the root formation is shown.  Treat this area pretty much as you would treat growing branches, gradually losing the roots in the earth. Don't stick the tree in the ground as if it were a telegraph pole.  Paint it the way it grows, rhythmically and proportionally.   

MORE IDEAS ABOUT TREES

To paint tree trunks and branches, first complete the composition and planning of the picture.  Carefully draw the tree by pushing your pencil upward, rolling it between your fingers as you push in order to get the bark-like irregularity of the tree's outline.  Then use a very thin wash of ivory back and use it quite wet.

While paper is still wet. add orange in the warm areas of the tree but do not cover black paint completely.  Note how colorful black can become.

Now use darker color notes where shadows are necessary, thus giving the tree dimension and character.  These shadows are soft because the painting is still moist.

 

After paint is dry, complete tree textures such as bark, nodules around knots, etc.;  then paint in the background in a diffused manner.  This will make the tree the prominent part of the picture.  Try the same method on other trees, using other colors, such as green (mossy effect). blue, and sepia.  The results will be fascinating as well as instructive.

To paint summer leaves and foliage, first put a wash of lemon yellow over the area where the sky does not show.

 

While this is still wet, lay on a wash of orange and Hooker's green for first value, showing the light coming from the left.

Now put on your third value of sepia, orange, and Hooker's green while painting is still wet.

When all color is dry, add the trunk and twigs in the slots where the sky appears and also add a few leaves on the outer edges.

In painting a tree. always try to identify it by its general structure and indicate the time of year by its foliage or lack of it.  

 

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