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Watercolor-Just-Got-Easier
January 06, 2009
Hi

WATERCOLOR PAINTING JUST GOT EASIER FOR YOU

NO MORE TIME WASTING WITH TRIAL AND ERROR

SUPRISE YOUR CLOSE ONE'S WHEN THEY SEE YOUR PAINTINGS

IF YOU THINK YOU CAN PAINT OR IF YOU THINK YOU CANNOT PAINT YOU ARE RIGHT.

YOU CAN LEARN TO PAINT BEAUTIFUL WATERCOLORS.

TREES

This is an easy way to "indicate" this is a tree.

A symbol if you like.

Not the best way if you want to make a tree a leading major element of your painting.

This is just for a background tree telling the viewer "hello I am a tree" but not a very important element.

Greatly enlarged for this example.    

FIG 1

Draw in tree trunk etc.

Paint with clean water.

While it is still wet, drop in on the left side color, your choice about one quarter (1/4) of the drawn width of trunk.  TIP:  , let the painted edge run into wet three quarters (3/4).  If this runs too far (like this one did) try tipping it in the opposite direction (running paint back towards area painted first on left side).

Just realized why this bombed out (thought it was Holiday Hangover).

Guess What?

Painted on Hot Press paper.  Painted the demo also on Hot Press, no wonder could not get any texture on water or rocks.

Paper is too smooth to form textures.

Big mistake- - Jim.

Better choice would have been Cold Press or Rough Paper.

FIG  2 

 

Trunks, limbs, branches and twigs should be semi straight lines.  Draw a short distance and change direction, look very carefully at   Note no twigs  were painted in this Fig , If you want a dead looking tree no twigs , live looking add twigs.

FIG 4

 

 

Now look at  Fig 3

 

- do not draw or paint, trunks, limbs, branches and twigs with "Female Curves."

 

The trunk and limbs etc., should be straight, angular shapes or lines as opposed to curved trunks, limbs, that you may well see in real life.  Don't copy nature here.

The trunk retains it's same thickness along it's run until a limb comes off it.  After this point, the trunk is less thick than it started out.

This idea is repeated as each limb leaving the trunk until there is no trunk left.  See FIG 4

 

Now think of the limbs, branches also going through the same process.

Limb stays same thickness until branch comes off it, thickness is then reduced, branch same as above.

Note no twigs shown, but a tree will look dead if you don't.

Painting a particular species of hardwood is simply done by varying this standard idea for a tree.

Oak trees have twists and turns making trunk, limbs and branches twisting shapes.

Eucalyptus has graceful limbs.

Young trees sometimes have no limbs going directly from trunk to branches.

Demo

STEP  1

 

Light Gray uneven wash over the background.  Dry it.

STEP  2

Using same Gray with touch of Burnt Sienna paint in background trees , the very thin distant ones.  With a tissue blot out parts of the trunk middle giving the impression of mist or fog.

Step  3

 

Paint in two dark trees in center, using Burnt Sienna and Paynes Gray.  Mop up parts with dry brush.  Dry it.

STEP 4

 

Painted the three larger trunks - started with carefully covering the trunk with plain water.  As described in Fig1.

Next came the Purple Blue Mexican Sage Bushes .  Some close up, some in background.

Next the rocks, at this point I realized "oops" could not get texture Hot Press Paper very smooth surface.  Cold Press Paper or Rough would have been ideal, but press on, painted the best this paper would allow.

Painted rocks one at a time.

Mixture - Burnt Sienna plus Ultra Marine Blue.  Don't mix together in the palette, mix on paper.

Whilst still wet, take hand and rub in the knuckle of your fingers.  Then, take a razor blade or similar item, bladed knife maybe, and scrape out some lights.  Dry them,then detail with small brush.

 

Paint stream using Ultra Marine Blue and Cerulean Blue with the side of a round brush that is fairly dry, brushing with horizontal strokes.

 

What Dorothy and I are considering is making short videos of these demonstrations.  What do you think?

 

 

THIS SECTION OF THE NEWS LETTER IS JUST A BIT MORE ADVANCED.

Treat it accordingly.

 

PICTORIAL SPACE.

You can probably guess or know what the term means, but here's a full definition to help you.

DEEP

 >          

The term pictorial space describes the illusion of space or depth apparent in a painting.  This illusion is achieved by replicating the effects of linear and aerial perspective, by changing the scale of objects from big to small, and by overlapping objects (all the devicesDelacroix uses in the painting .

Deep pictorial space is being suited to romantic landscape painting.

SHALLOW

                

With the exception of the Romantic landscape painters of the 19th century, most artists since the Renaissance have composed their subjects in shallow pictorial space.  By closing off the back of the painting with a surface that often runs parallel to the picture plane, they confine and direct the viewer's attention through the design to their intended subject.

FLATTENED

           

Inspired by Japanese prints, the Post-Impressionists - Cezanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh, began to flatten the pictorial space in their work.  By bringing the background area forward, by reducing modeling, and by subtly tipping objects to provide multiple viewpoints, they created paintings in which objects seemed to rise in pictorial space rather than move back.  Realistic representation with full modeling of form and the illusion of deep space was replaced by this more decorative, flattened treatment of space.

FLAT

          

Cezanne's experiments with space led to Cubism and then to the flat approach adopted by Picasso, Braque, and Matisse.  Of course, there is nothing new about flat design; the early cave artists worked with flat space; Asian art depends on flat space; and most decorative art from the Egyptions on is designed with flat space.  Today most artists work with flattened or flat space, carefully controlling the illusion of depth created by aerial and linear perspective, the diminishing scale of objects, and obvious overlap.

MAKE A CHOICE

Which treatment of pictorial space do you use?  Why?  It is the best choice?  Does it reinforce the intention of your design?  Think about it.

 

 

NOTE FROM - JIM

Could you help, encourage some of your fellow artists that come from all parts of the world.

It might take a few minutes of your time , is that asking too much, of course not.   Just image their thoughts taking the time  to place a painting for comments and nobody helps ,on the other hand a few comments pro or con  would be a thrill for them.  We have just posted some paintings from Turkey and lots of other places around the world.

Reach out and offer some of your thoughts.

This is what you do - go to my website - www.jims-watercolor-gallery.com   Then click on submit your work (left column) scroll down to "what other visitors have said".  This is a list of paintings submitted by artists like you, trying to improve, help them with just a few minutes of your time, Could you do this for us    

Maybe go to some of the "Titles without Stars" (bottom of list) then add your comments.

At the bottom of the painting click here to post comments.

Return to list, post a few more comments.  Thanks for your help.

P.S.  I spend about 10 to 15 hours producing this news letter which I dearly love to do. (Remember to improve your painting teach somebody).

Just 15 minutes of your time - be a good sport.

My biggest joy is not how well I paint , but having students learn and carry it internally and pass it on    Stay tuned  for next weeks news Letter  Enjoy    Jim and Dorothy

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