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Watercolor-Just-Got-Easier
November 04, 2008
Hi

WATERCOLOR PAINTING JUST GOT EASIER FOR YOU

NO MORE TIME WASTING WITH TRIAL AND ERROR

SUPRISE YOUR CLOSE ONE'S WHEN THEY SEE YOUR PAINTINGS

IF YOU THINK YOU CAN PAINT OR IF YOU THINK YOU CANNOT PAINT YOU ARE RIGHT.

YOU CAN LEARN TO PAINT BEAUTIFUL WATERCOLORS.

 

COLOR SCHEME

So far we have talked about :-

PRIMARY COLOR

SECONDARY COLOR

TERTIARY

ANALGOUS

COLOR SCHEMES.

There is at least another you might want to try.

COMPLEMENTARY  SCHEME

RED  +  GREEN

 BLUE  +  ORANGE

YELLOW  +  VIOLET

And all the other complements you can come up with.

Remember to how identify complements with ease. (In other words you don't have to think too much).

TIP:    Three primaries are Red, Blue and Yellow.

Mix together any two, the one remaining color is the complement of the result of the color you just made by mixing the first two.

EXAMPLES:-  Mix Blue and Yellow  =  Green.  Remaining color is Red, so Green is complement to Red.

Mix Red and Blue  =  Violet.  Remaining Primary is Yellow, so Violet is complementary to Yellow.

This is given to you again, because we retain about 10% of spoken and written ideas the first time, I am therefore working on your other 90%.

So the complements are on the opposite side to each other on the color wheel.  They make great tools for creating harmony providing you don't mix them together - results in Gray to Black.

A color comes to life when you place it next to it's complement.

Got a dull looking Green area, try placing "on" Red in the dull area,or placing red next to the area

Notice I said "on" that does not mean you mix Red with Green (result could be a dull area).

Try this, to keep the brush away from mixing, tap the brush containing Red against another brush, some Artist's use the index finger, not me, another brush handle works fine.

Tap brush holding Red over the damp Green.  Result could be a big mess or be great.

Again a color that appears to be mud or a dull Gray will spring to life when surrounded by Orange, as Red + Yellow = Orange. Remaining color Blue, so what happens is Orange awakens the complement Blue in that dull Gray.

For a strong focal point in your picture, contrasting opposites will automatically stimulate the eye and draw the viewers attention to that area of your painting.

TIP:-  When you select a complementary color scheme, be sure you emphasize one of the colors and de-emphasize the other.

Important point to think about, you can have complementary schemes with not only the primary colors but secondary and Tertiary colors too.

QUIZ:-  Yellow/Green is a complement to..............?

A few moments ago, mention was made of the "Focal Point" -  center of interest is a better word.

It is not normally a "Point" but an area, you want to draw the viewer to.  Where would you design and place this area on your paper.

This might be all you need.

Divide painting into thirds vertically and horizontally where they cross,(should be four places) if you come up with a different number, TILT.

Next thing besides drawing the attention to an area of interest with complements.  How else can you do it?

 

HIGHEST CONTRAST

MOST WHITE PAPER

PLACE MOST DETAIL HERE.

EDGES THAT ARE SHARP.

But don't choose something that might be obvious.  Be different , be you.

In determining  where the area is going to be is the first step.  Next how are you going to give it "life"

Look at the given list.

How about placing a large boulder in the bottom right  intersection of our lines. This is going  to be our  area  of interest         Background of fuzzy foliage.    Brushwork  could be used to good effect,making edges that are sharp. some detail on the boulder ,highest contrast . really make this boulder stand out.

Maybe shadows leading up to the rock across the foreground, dark shadow at the very base,  GOT IT?

Snow scene, fall colors on the brushes in background, now place a white birch tree (saved with frisket) against the colors.  A simple tree, could even be a few twigs of white against the Oranges and Reds.  This example will also point the viewer to the white tree or twigs.

TO SUM IT UP:

Before you start a painting, it's a good idea to determine where the focal area will be, you only have four choices.

Now you have made a decision start work there, leave the sky off for now, paint the focal area with the brightest colors, highest contrast, sharpest edges and most detail.

Now use this area as the basis of comparison for painting everything else.

But Jim, I have always painted the sky first in a landscape, well just try this way.

You will want the viewer to focus on this area inside the painting (one of the four areas).

This is where they will linger over the other parts of the painting.  No other parts of the painting must compete with the focal area.

Relatively little detail, darker colors and softer edges along the perimeter to hold your attention in the focal area.  Do not put any fussy colorful details around the perimeter.

GOT IT?

See you next week.  Please tell a friend.

 

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