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Watercolor-Just-Got-Easier
October 21, 2008
Hi

WATERCOLOR PAINTING JUST GOT EASIER FOR YOU

NO MORE TIME WASTING WITH TRIAL AND ERROR

SUPRISE YOUR CLOSE ONE'S WHEN THEY SEE YOUR PAINTINGS

IF YOU THINK YOU CAN PAINT OR IF YOU THINK YOU CANNOT PAINT YOU ARE RIGHT.

YOU CAN LEARN TO PAINT BEAUTIFUL WATERCOLORS.

COLOR SCHEME

Do you have a color scheme in mind before you paint?   Or do you wing it?   Or do you copy colors from someone else.

 Let's see if we can learn to do the first 0ption.

Learn to select color schemes that are harmonious and portray the underlying spirit of your subject matter.

In this the World Wide Web, you must be aware that culture customs and traditions generally determine your response to a color.

Example:  The color black in parts of the world that I am familiar with, signifies dark, night, mourning, death etc., however, in Japan one wears a white kimono to a traditional funeral.  These are some of my personal thoughts about various colors, they may not be yours.

RED:--------Danger, Romantic, Delicate, Courage, Passion, Feminine, etc.

BLUE: ------Heavenly, Water, Cold, Melancholy.

Yellow:-----Sunny,Radiant, Cowardly.

PURPLE:--- Religion, Royal.

GREEN :---  Nature, Fresh, Envious.

ORANGE:-- Autumn, Cheerful, Lively.

BROWN:--  Earthy, Reliable, Conservative.

BLACK----   Mourning, Evil, Dramatic.

WHITE:---  Peaceful, Innocent.

NOTICE:     Red for example, was listed as romantic, feminine etc.   Not what you expected?    Don't Agree!.

Changing the value, temperature or intensity of a color will change your reaction.

How can Red be feminine.   Easy  change the value to a very light Red, close to Pink.  GOT IT.

Well how about romantic?  (I don't mean he/she).  Easy use or make the Red cooler, bunch of Red (cool) roses might do the trick.

More ideas, Passion,   Orange/Red like a fire.

Danger,  you know that,   Bright Red.

Courage,  dark red cross carried into battle etc.

THIS IS FUN........

Imagine what you can "say" with many different color.

A "Blue" collar-worker with a "Green" thumb made his neighbors see "Red", but they were caught "Red" handed and were "Black" listed and could not attend the "Blue" plate special event and finished up "Green" with envy.

Whenever possible utilize symbolic colors and intelligent manipulation of colors in your paintings to dramatize the mood you want to convey to the viewer.

Did you not see, just written text describes your neighbor with that Green lawn and friends attending that Blue plate lunch.

Choose unique colors that breathe new life into your subject.

BUT HOW? ..........CHOOSE A COLOR SCHEME.

HARMONIOUS COLORS.

Bounce color off the building into the surrounding trees.

Apply the complement of the building into the trees into bushes and foreground.

See the shadow along the bottom of the roof, modify the building color, rather than just apply a dark shadow (as in unrelated color picture.)

         

       

Maintain the dominate analogous color scheme of Yellow-Red-Orange, with complements painted in.

Let's look at some popular color schemes.

First we have -------------Primary Color

Next we have-------------Secondary Color

Next we have-------------Tertiary Color

Along with-----------------Analogous Color

Then-----------------------Complementary Color.

Very popular---------------Monochromatic Color.

There are a few others but for now we will leave those alone.

Re-Cap:----- Secondary Colors are colors produced by mixing two of the three primaries together.

Blue/Yellow ========Green

Red/Yellow=========Orange

Blue/Red==========Violet.

Tertiary Colors are produced by mixing a secondary color with a Prime Color.


Orange/Red========Orange Red  (1)

Violet/Blue=========Violet Blue     (2)

Green/Yellow=======Green Yellow (3)         

Violet Red==========Violet Red      (4)

Green/Blue=========Green Blue    (5)

Orange/Yellow======Orange Yellow (6)

So here is the basic color wheel

3  -  Primary Colors

3  -  Secondary Colors

6  -  Tertiary Colors.

I could quite easy paint a color wheel for you.  CAN YOU?   WILL YOU?  It might not be a bad idea.

CLUE:---Start in a clockwise direction,  Red ,   Red  Violet,    Violet,    Blue Violet,    Blue,     Blue Green, Green (that's half way around the wheel).        

Notice the pattern,  Prime Color,   Tertiary Color, Secondary Color,   Tertiary color      Prime Color and starts all over again.

PRIME COLOR SCHEME.

YELLOW  -  BLUE  -  RED.

These colors are energetic, direct, bold statements can be made

Look at Grandma Moses prints. She loved to use this scheme.

You can mix all three to neutralized (makes Gray) or placed side by side to make a bold dramatic statement.

Always let one of the prime colors be dominate.  The other two will be happy to act as supporting colors.

To make the painting bright and exciting, place the three colors next to each other as often as possible without mixing them together.

It is possible to add a few secondary colors that do not overwhelm the color scheme.

SECONDARY COLOR SCHEME

Great for nature scenes.  Be careful you don't fall into a boring trap of all green grass and foliage, Orange Autumn trees and Violet mountains.

Stray a little, reflect Orange Violet into the grass, trees, try shadows of trees with a Violet cast shadow, on the Orange/Green grass.

Again, only one "color star" to be dominate in the painting.

Try this a potted plant sitting on a table in bright sunlight, 50% of leaves white to very pale green in the sun, darken Green leaves in shadow (violet mixture)    Pot and table Orange/Yellow .  Background and flowers Violet

       

This  was painted by Betty Dawes a student ,did a great job

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